August 20 – Deeds Not Creeds & The Known and the Unknown – Rev. Linda Lawrence

Our second source of inspiration as listed in the bylaws of the Unitarian Universalist Association is:  “Words and deeds of prophetic women and men which challenge us to confront powers and structures of evil with justice, compassion, and the transforming power of love.”  For those reading the book, the focus will be pp. 41 – 80.  Each of the services in this series will include a time of silence and sharing. Attendance at previous parts of this series is not necessary for benefit and enjoyment of today’s message.

 August 27 – The Cathedral of the World & Dialogue – Rev. Linda Lawrence
We claim “wisdom from the world’s religions which inspires us in our ethical and spiritual life” as one of the sources of our religious tradition.  For those reading A Chosen Faith, the basis for this sermon series, see pp. 81- 118.  Each of the services in this series will include a time of silence and sharing.  Attendance at previous parts of this series is not necessary for benefit and enjoyment of today’s message.
September 3 – Neighborhood & Expectations – Rev. Linda Lawrence
We continue exploring the sources of inspiration as cited in our Unitarian Universailst Association bylaws.  Today’s focus will be upon “Jewish and Christian teachings which call us to respond to God’s love by loving our neighbors as ourselves.”   For those reading A Chosen Faith, the basis for this sermon series, see pp. 119 – 154.  Each of the services in this series will include a time of silence and sharing.  Reading the book or attendance at previous parts of this series are not necessary for benefit and enjoyment of today’s message.  Please note that the remaining two sources of inspiration will be addressed later in this congregational year.
September 10 – The Transformational Power of Welcome – Rev. Tina Squire
In recent years several different denominations have embraced the term “radical hospitality.”  The word “radical” comes from the term “root” and suggests change that goes to the core of who we are. Numerous writers affirm that both those who give and those who receive deeply generous welcome are profoundly altered by the practice.  We will consider how we can be open to these two sides of welcome.